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Primitive Postures of Restoration

Primitive Postures of Restoration

“There are four positions of Zen: Lying Zen, Sitting Zen, Standing Zen, and Walking Zen.” Alan Watts   The terms biomimetics and biomimicry come from Ancient Greek: βίος (bios), life, and μίμησις (mīmēsis), imitation, from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), to imitate, from μῖμος (mimos), actor. Influenced by Biomimetics or biomimicry is the imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems. UpRight Movement often refers to nature’s archetype of success for guidance with its rationale in helping you to feel, move, and perform better. Understanding human development from a distant and not so distant past perspective can help us to understand movement in a broader context. The bookends of movement as well as our days is rest; the two are interwoven like a pendulum. Primitive Postures are naturally intended to be restorative. Primitive Postures are the original positions, which movement emerged from and returned back to for rest. The degree to which we are challenged within these Primitive Postures is the degree our restoration and movements are as well. Sitting on the floor in many postures is our birthright: Rising from these Primitive Postures to our full upright bipedal posture uses deeply embedded patterns, postures, and movement. Primitive Postures provide a quick but profound insight into the ease or dis-ease of your biomechanical state. You can learn WHAT these postures are and HOW to assess them. They are profoundly important. If these postures aren’t relaxing and restorative, and if living and moving with ease is valuable to you, then perhaps there is an area ready for some improvement. Standing up from the floor...
To Stand is to Be Human

To Stand is to Be Human

The hallmark of our species is walking upright on two legs- bipedalism. Getting up and down from the ground is an example of a “squat pattern”, which is the precursor to walking. When we start losing function within our bodies, it has an impact on the whole system. To see how you may be doing with your fitness, consider The Sit-Rising Test illustrated below. The research behind this test indicates that health is interdependent with functional fitness. The Sit-Rising Test was developed by Brazilian physician Claudio Gil Araujo and his colleagues of Brazil’s Gamo Filho University. When patients optimized their functional fitness with appropriate exercise and then retested, their scores improved, as did their overall health. Every additional point increase a patient had on the Sit-Rising Test correlated with a 21 percent DECREASE in mortality from all causes. The message Dr. Claudio Gil Araujo is trying to get across to people is the importance of getting and staying in shape. If you want to live a long and healthy life, you’ve got to build muscle, work on maintaining balance and MOVE. The Sit-Rising Test also provides valuable information on areas where you have room for improvement, such as mobility, stability, functional symmetry or total body strength. If you would like some guidance with improving your overall body function, UpRight Movement is a Force Multiplier and  has the knowledge, the tools, and the dedication to support you in Feeling, Moving, and Performing Better for Life....